How to make a vegan chocolate spread that is allergy free and tastes amazing!

Chocolate Buttercream Frosting

Chocolate Buttercream Frosting. I use Nuttelex + coconut milk to make a vegan, allergy free frosting that tastes amazing!

If you have a child with food allergies then you may find it difficult to source safe versions of products like Nutella. Alternatively, you may have a child attending a nut free kindergarten or school in which case Nutella isn’t permitted (as it contains hazelnuts). If you want to use a treat spread, for school lunches or parties, then this recipe will help you make your own!

Ingredients

  • 115g allergy friendly spread like Nuttelex (buttery taste)
  • 2 cups icing sugar
  • 1/2 cup Dutch Cocoa Powder
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla essence
  • 1 – 5 Tbsp  coconut milk

Allergies: gluten free, dairy free*, soy free, egg free, nut free. Vegan*.

Directions

  1. Whip the Nuttelex.
    • I like to use the food processsor (with a plastic beating tool rather than the metal cutting one).
  2. Sift in the cup icing sugar, and cocoa powder. Add the vanilla and 2 Tbsp milk.
  3. Beat until smooth.
    • I like to pulse it slowly in the food processor.
  4. Mix in more coconut milk, 1 Tbsp at a time, until you have a good thick smooth consistency.
  5. Store in an airtight container in the fridge.

Easy Banana Muffins (or Banana Cake) that can be made vegan and allergy free!

Banana cupcakes & gingerbread spice cookies

Banana cupcakes & gingerbread spice cookies. Made vegan and allergy free.

Banana cake has long been one of my nemesis; I just haven’t had the knack. I’m so glad to have finally found a recipe that works! It also has the wonderful bonus of being dairy, egg, soy, and nut free! I have also made it gluten free 🙂

Ingredients

  • 2 mashed / pureed ripe bananas*
  • 5 Tbsp neutral oil (I use rice bran)
  • 1/2 cup water + 1/2 cup water
  • 1 1/2c plain flour (or Healtheries Gluten Free Bread Mix).
  • 3/4c sugar
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 Tbsp vinegar (I use apple cider)

Tip: The riper the bananas, the better this will work! As the bananas ripen they convert starch to sugar. Really ripe bananas will mash more easily, be sweeter, and have a more intense banana flavour.

Gluten Free: You can, of course, use a different gluten free flour! The reason that I’ve listed that one is because it contains guar gum but no raising agents (as the recipe includes those). You could, for instance, substitute superfine rice flour and add guar gum. Personally, I don’t use xanthan gum as it can be grown using soy as a base. You may need to experiment a little with gluten free flours to get the cake just right (you may want to start with muffins as it’s easier to tell when they’re cooked). Keep in mind that gluten free baking is often moister, denser, and may require a longer baking time.

Allergies: soy free, dairy free, egg free, nut free, gluten free*

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 180’C and prepare muffin trays / cake tin.
  2. Mash your bananas until you have a smooth texture. Tip: A food processor can do this quickly for you but you’ll want to do the actual mixing by hand.
  3. Mix in the oil and 1/2 cup water.
  4. In a separate bowl, sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  5. Add the wet ingredients (banana, oil, water) to the dry ingredients. Add the vinegar.
  6. Stir till just combined. (Slowly add additional water if required).
  7. Quickly get into cupcake cases, muffin trays, or cake tin, and pop in oven.
  8. Bake until skewer comes out clean. Approximately 12 – 15 mins for muffins and 30-40 mins for cake.

Icings: Check out these ideas for completely natural icings that don’t use any artificial additives and are easy to make.

Tips: I’ve made this recipe several times. Lessons learned: using the plastic batter-stirrer-attachment-thingy for the food processor makes for a denser end product (so does over stirring by hand); the rising effect that you get from the vinegar + baking soda means that you want to get this into the oven quickly (instead of having a lengthy sidebar with your toddler about how baking is really just chemistry in the kitchen).

What is glycerin and is it good for me?

Glyercin in bathroom products

Glyercin in bathroom products

It’s funny how invisible ingredient labels have become in our modern lifestyle. We take for granted that there are lots of words, chemicals, compounds, and numbers that we don’t recognize. The dynamic journey that I’m on with my daughter means delving into those labels to find out more.

What is glycerin?

Glycerin, also known as glycerol, is an organic compound that is commonly made of animal fat or vegetable oil. It’s clear, odourless, and has a sweet taste.

If you’re interested in it’s molecular formula, check out this post by Allan Robinson.

What is glycerin used for?

We can safely ignore some of its more explosive uses, like being used to make nitroglycerin (an active part of dynamite); we’re most likely to encounter it in food products or beauty products. It’s widely used because products often dissolve more easily into it (than water or alcohol) and because it’s believed to help moisturise skin.

Go have a look in your bathroom and you will find glycerin in many of your products including:

  • Toothpaste
  • Soap
  • Shampoo & Conditioner
  • Skincare products.

In the kitchen, you can find it in foods but not as frequently. It’s often used in diet / low sugar products or as a base for things like ‘Peppermint Essence’.

Should I be concerned?

For most people, the answer is no. Glycerin is widely considered to have all kinds of benefits for skincare.

For some people, like those with eczema, glycerin is often an important component in moisturising treatments.

For some, for instance vegans, the source of glycerin may conflict with personal beliefs.

What is vegetable glycerin made from?

The main cause for concern about vegetable glycerin is if you have a soy allergy.

Vegetable glycerin is commonly made from soybean oil, palm oil, or coconut oil. If you’ve read my post about soybean oil then you’ll know it’s cheap, readily available, and widely used internationally in a variety of commercial products – which is a problem if you’re allergic.

I’ve spent a lot of time trying to find out if sufficient soy protein can transmit through the manufacturing process to remain present in the end product (glycerin). The reality is that I don’t know – I’m also not certain if it’s been particularly well studied. Soy lecithin and soybean oil are not FDA regulated because they are considered to be ‘generally safe’ – unless you’re allergic to them (like my daughter).

It’s certainly something to be aware of if you (or a family member) is allergic to soy and has symptoms that don’t seem to be going away. If you’ve eliminated all other sources of soy then try reconsidering your bathroom. It’s also possible that exposure through other means may be cumulative over time or result in a low grade reaction; you know your allergy symptoms best. It’s certainly food for thought!

Candied Salted Caramel Pumpkin Seeds

Candied Salted Caramel Pumpkin Seeds

Candied Salted Caramel Pumpkin Seeds

I love this recipe! It’s a fantastic candied treat that’s great for parties and for holidays. If you have food allergies in the family, it’s also a great recipe to pass to grandparents who want to spoil the kids! It’s also ideal to take to kindergarten parties and pot lucks as it’s free of all major allergens!

Don’t be put off by the idea of pumpkin seeds – these are nothing like the raw ones that you get in salads. These are as different as corn is after it’s popped and are sweet, salty, and crunchy like M&Ms. They are dangerously addictive and are great eaten straight, sprinkled on fruit crumble, or on top of ice cream.

Ingredients

In the oven:

  • 2c pumpkin seeds
  • 2 1/2T sugar
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • Pinch nutmeg
  • 3T water
  • Oil for roasting dish

Caramel sauce

  • 1 1/2T allergy-free spread (i.e. Nuttelex) / butter
  • 2 1/2T brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt

Allergies: gluten free, dairy free, soy free, egg free, nut free.

Note: If nut allergies are not a concern,this recipe will also work well with peanuts, cashews, and almonds.

Directions

  1. Pre-heat oven to 180’C and lightly oil a baking dish (I used a silicon flan / pie dish).
  2. Mix all of the oven ingredients together and pour into the baking dish. Note: the water is important because it helps the spices to stick to the pumpkin seeds (and the seeds will absorb the water a little as they puff up during cooking).
  3. Bake the pumpkin seeds for 20-25 mins until golden and crunchy.
  4. Once the pumpkin seeds are cooked, mix the caramel sauce ingredients together in a pot. Cook for 1-2 minutes until the ingredients have melted and turned a deep golden brown.
  5. Mix the caramel sauce and pumpkin seeds together until well coated. Spread on a tray and allow to  cool.

Raw Food Snickers Bar Cheesecake

Raw Food Snickers Bar Cheesecake.jpg

Raw Food Snickers Bar Cheesecake

This was amazing!! It was also expensive but totally worth taking Miss 2 for a rare treat after yet another hospital appointment. Raw HQ is run by a lovely mum & nutritionist and stocks a range of allergy friendly / vegan  / paleo foods.

Want to have a go making something like this at home? There are lots of recipes online (though none with exactly the same ingredients as this delicious treat), here is a sampling of them; remember that you can use the base from one, the filling from another etc. to make your own favourite recipe!

Better Food Fair – check out these great products for wellness & healthy living!

Strawberry Rhubarb raw food cake.jpg

Amazing cakes from The Raw Kitchen! Vegan, paleo, and gluten free.

I had an amazing time today at the Better Food Fair and Go Green Expo thanks to some promo tickets.

Check out the slideshow for some of the awesome products!

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Purebread have some great gluten-free products (including bread that is also soy free!). Enter discount code nopesticides to get $3 off every loaf, buns, pizza packs, & flatbreads.

Lalele Organic is a mobile food shop with beautiful organic popsicles. They had a huge range of gourmet flavours; like: Orange & Cardamom, Feijoa Sorbet, Mango & Coconut & Masala Chai.

Raw Kitchen have amazingly delicious raw foods (their cakes are fabulous!). It’s a wonderful treat if you have food allergies! They’re online, have a cafe in Auckland (NZ), and have also published a beautiful recipe book.

Storm & India have beautiful bespoke organic teas. I’m drinking their Vintage Chai while I type!

All Natural Mums have an exciting range of kids products like pretty play make-up sets, hair chalk, and edible, organic nail polish.

Dr Martha Nessler was lovely to meet and chat with about doTERRA essential oils.

NuFoods have a yummy nut butters; I liked the Almond & Coconut best.

Munch Cupboard have some great products, like reusable sandwich bags.

Angel Foods are bring a vegan, dairy and soy free, cheese to New Zealand. Cheeses like Daiya are apparently cheap in the USA but shockingly expensive in New Zealand so it’s great to see an addition to the market.

Be Nourished have a range of fermented products, like Sauerkraut and Kimchi, to promote inner gut health.

Pure Coco have a range of natural products including allergy friendly chocolate!

Love Skin have beautiful botannical hand blended oils for a touch of luxury.