Easy no-knead dinner rolls

 

I found this recipe online which claimed I could make bread rolls in only 30 minutes. Brilliant! I thought, I can make them before kindy and we can have them with soup for lunch. If I hadn’t been so sleep deprived I would have seen through the marketing ploy earlier as the recipe completely ignores the required rising time and assumes the barest minimum for prep & bake times.

Despite that, it is worth being aware of recipes like these as they are simple enough that kids can help make them and they don’t have to be kneaded.

Pros: no / minimal kneading, quick (as breadmaking goes), Miss 3 loved them, lovely hot out of the oven.

Cons: a sweet roll (works for kids! depends on your tastes); good straight out of the oven and fine the next day but becomes denser each day so on Days 2 & 3 you may want to warm slightly.

This is a slightly thicker bread roll that reminds me a little of a bready scone!

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups warm water
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. breadmakers yeast
  • 1/3 cup neutral oil (I use rice bran)
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 egg
  • 3 1/2 cups high grade flour

Allergies: dairy free, soy free, nut free.

Directions

  1. Dissolve yeast in warm water and sugar in a large bowl. Add in oil, salt, egg and flour until combined. (Add a little extra flour if dough is too sticky.)
  2. Shape immediately into about 15 rolls and place in a greased 9×13″ cake tin. Let raise for about 15-20 minutes in a warm space.
  3. Preheat oven to 375ºF / 190’C. Bake rolls for about 15-20 minutes.

 

Tips: The original recipe aimed for a 15 min prep time; you can just throw everything in a bowl, do no kneading, and it will work. If you’re willing to invest a little extra time you can get a better result by:

  • Giving the yeast a few minutes to feed on the sugar and grow. As they feed on the sugar they release carbon dioxide gas which will give a bubbly foamy effect. Giving the yeast time to activate means that it will be better able to convert the starches in the flour and then those gas bubbles interact with the gluten to provide a light, fluffy, rising effect in the dough.
  • Give the dough sufficient rising time. This will vary depending on the temperature (they like 75°F-85°F / 24°C-29°C) and if you’ve done any kneading. Ideally, they will almost double in size.
  • Knead the dough for at least a few minutes. Kneading helps to develop the gluten in the flour so that you’ll get a lighter, fluffier roll.

 

What should I cook the rolls in?

The original recipe calls for a metal cake tin. The recipe is aiming for speed and this allows heat to radiate off the walls of the cake tin (as well as something of a steaming effect from the rolls touching). You could also just use a metal baking tray and cook a little longer if needed.

Using a large ceramic dish, like I did, means that the tops browned but the bottoms steamed (like bao). I ended up putting them back in the oven (upside down) on a metal tray and browning them just a little.

 

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